Categories: Public Interest Law Municipal and Local Government Real Estate, Land Use, and Community Law

Antitrust

Course Page for Spring 2022 -

This course provides a survey of American antitrust law. The primary focus is on the Sherman Act and Clayton Act provisions regulating restraints of trade, monopoly, and merger. Brief attention is given to the separate powers of the Federal Trade Commission and to the relationship of antitrust law to intellectual property rights. In addition, there will be some presentation of the antitrust law of other countries. Time permitting, there will also be a brief introduction of the Robinson-Patman Act.

Learning Outcomes - By the end of the semester students will:
1. appreciate the relevance of basic economic analysis of market conduct, structure and incentives
2. understand and apply the ancillary restraint concept
3. have a basic understanding of the different frameworks within which antitrust analysis is done
4. be able to do a basic written analysis of a competitive problem applying one or more analytic frameworks

Civil Disobedience, Strikes, and 'Riots'

Course Page for Fall 2022 - Braver, Josh

See individual sections for descriptions.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Fall 2022
Fall 2022

Compliance and the Law

Course Page for Spring 2022 - Ohnesorge, John

This seminar will provide students with a multi-dimensional introduction to the ubiquitous phenomenon of compliance. We will begin by exploring foundational issues, such as the many sources of compliance demands in today’s society, as well as the complexities that arise when institutions, public or private, are subject to these demands. We will then turn to specific applied topics such as the role of law firms in supplying compliance services, the Justice Department’s fluctuating policies with respect to prosecuting corporate wrongdoing, or the system for certifying organic food production. Students will complete substantial writing assignments on compliance topics of their choosing, and these may take the form of either research memos or scholarly essays. The final sessions of the class will be devoted to student presentations of their research.

Biz Orgs I and Administrative Law are highly recommended, either in advance or concurrently with this seminar

Construction Law, Contracting and Negotiation

Course Page for Spring 2021 - Aiken, Jeffrey

This course, generally offered in the spring every other year, will study a broad array of legal and practical issues encountered with inter-dependent transactions focused on, but not limited to, the construction industry, including contracting, negotiation, and dispute resolution strategies and tactics -- with in-class drafting exercises addressing key provisions of such process-oriented transactions. Course materials will include an extensive, easy-to-read ABA textbook plus a comprehensive set of PowerPoint slides and various other supplemental items. A former student evaluation characterized the course as being "taught...in a way to make it applicable to all fields of law, not just construction."

Consumer Health Advocacy Overview

Course Page for Summer 2022 -

See individual sections for descriptions.

Defense Function

Course Page for Spring 2022 - Gross, John

See individual sections for descriptions.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Spring 2022
Spring 2021

Disability Antidiscrimination Law

Course Page for Spring 2021 - Guevara, Angelica

The course will examine the law of disability discrimination, primarily based upon the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Section 504 and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The course will provide counter-narratives on current disability discourse to help lawyers become better advocates.

Domestic Violence

Course Page for Fall 2022 - Young, Morgan

See individual sections for descriptions.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Fall 2022
Fall 2021
Fall 2020

Ethical Issues in Crim Justice (Defender Project)

Course Page for Fall 2022 - Gross, John

See individual sections for descriptions.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Fall 2022
Fall 2021
Fall 2020

Ethical Issues in Crim Justice (Prosecution Project)

Course Page for Fall 2022 - Glinberg, Lanny

See individual sections for descriptions.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Fall 2022
Fall 2021
Fall 2020

Evidence

Course Page for Summer 2021 13-Week Session - Peterson, Kim

See individual sections for descriptions.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Summer 2021 13-Week Session

Evidence (AKK session)

Course Page for Summer 2022 13-Week Session - Peterson, Kim

See individual sections for descriptions.

Food Law

Course Page for Spring 2022 - Levenson, Barry

Sharpen your most important legal skills while you snack. Students will write briefs and present oral arguments on the hottest topics in food law today. What is "natural?" Is Wisconsin's "Cheeseburger Law" unconstitutional? Can food executives be sent to prison for the negligence of their companies? Lots more, because in this class a J.D. is just a Jelly Doughnut. Eating in class is not only allowed, it is required

By the end of this course, students should understand:
1. How the law embodies our twelve expectations of food;
2. The history of food regulation in the United States and the relationship between the states and federal government in food oversight;
3. The role of litigation in protecting food safety and preventing food fraud;
4. The importance of core constitutional principles (First Amendment, Fourth Amendment, Commerce Clause, and Supremacy Clause) in food law;
5. How the law may be used to advance a national food policy, including a healthier diet;
6. The role of the criminal law in advancing food safety.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Spring 2022
Spring 2021

From Patient to Policy

Course Page for Spring 2022 - Jacklitz, Jill

See individual sections for descriptions.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Spring 2022
Fall 2021

I.P. Licensing

Course Page for Spring 2021 - von Simson, Charles

Intellectual Property Licensing

Intellectual property is the most valuable asset of many businesses. The value derives in substantial part from the ability to transfer limited rights to use copyrights, patents, trademarks and trade secrets. IP licenses define how those rights are shared and exploited, and consequently how participants in many industries collaborate and compete.

This course will investigate the drafting and application of intellectual property licenses, relying on several examples from the software industry. Throughout the course the class will discuss strategies for revising and simplifying license agreements to better address the changing business needs of IP rights holders and their licensees.

Intro to I.P. is a pre-required course.

Implications of Tech Developments on Business & Law

Course Page for Fall 2020 - Smith, Anne

The Implications of Tech Developments on Business & Law Course (the “Capstone Course”) is a capstone experience for transactionally focused law students that combines an externship and classroom component. The Capstone Course will introduce students to a select subset of modern technical innovations presented by industry and campus leaders on the subject. In the week after each class, students will participate in a focused discussion related to the legal, ethical, social, and business issues presented by the innovation. Additionally, students will engage with industry Partners to explore innovation from the experience of a company that regularly engages with disruptive technology.

Learning Outcomes
Goal #1: To provide each student with dynamic interdisciplinary experience with a partner entity (a “Partner”) that will engage the student holistically in the Partner’s business and provide context to practicing law in a complex environment.

Students will demonstrate the following competencies:

• Critical thinking and judgment
• Legal analysis and reasoning
• Pragmatic problem solving
• Strategic thinking and judgment
• Service Orientation with Partners
• Responsiveness to Partner
• Good Partner rapport and relationships
• Effective planning and organization of work
• Communicates clearly and effectively with Partner
• Effective teamwork

Metric: At the end of each semester, Partner supervisors will provide written feedback regarding student skill in the relevant competency.

Goal #2: Engage students in thinking more deeply about the ways in which the law will adapt to technical innovation.

Students will demonstrate the following competencies:

• Critical thinking and judgment
• Understanding of inter-relatedness of business, ethical, social, and legal issues applied to innovation
• Legal analysis and reasoning
• Pragmatic problem solving
• Strategic thinking and judgment
• Communication
• Effective oral communication
• Effective written communication
• Effective listening

Metric: At the end of each semester each student will develop a graded 30-60 minute presentation and discussion related to an area of interest discussed during the course and demonstrating the above skills.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Fall 2020

Implications of Tech on Business & Law

Course Page for Fall 2021 - Smith, Anne

The Implications of Tech Developments on Business & Law Course (the “Capstone Course”) is a capstone experience for transactionally focused law students that combines an externship and classroom component. The Capstone Course will introduce students to a select subset of modern technical innovations presented by industry and campus leaders on the subject. In the week after each class, students will participate in a focused discussion related to the legal, ethical, social, and business issues presented by the innovation. Additionally, students will engage with industry Partners to explore innovation from the experience of a company that regularly engages with disruptive technology.

LGBTQ+ Law

Course Page for Fall 2022 - Churchill, Abby

LGBTQ+ Law

This course will explore the unique legal issues impacting the LGBTQ+ community. Legal frameworks surrounding sexual orientation and gender identity are among the most dynamic and rapidly evolving in all of law. We will focus on those areas in which we are currently witnessing history being made.

Con Law I strongly recommended; but can take Con Law I concurrently.

Learning Outcomes:

This course is designed to:

1. Familiarize you with the basic knowledge of sexual orientation, gender identity, and the law, along with subject matter areas relevant to various aspects of LGBTQ+ life and the primary legal doctrine most relevant in that area.

2. Help you achieve a general understanding of how to apply what is learned about each subject matter area and its respective legal doctrines so that you can confidently work with LGBTQ+ clients.

3. Help you cultivate ways to communicate the changes we are currently seeing to non-lawyers.

4. Give you keen insight into jurisprudence as it is rapidly-evolving before our very eyes, and facilitate consideration about what the next 5 years may look like for the LGBTQ+ community.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Fall 2022
Fall 2021

Labor Relations

Course Page for Spring 2022 -

"Labor Relations" is a detailed examination of the National Labor Relations Act with an emphasis on representation issues, collective bargaining, protection of individual rights, enforcement of the Act against both labor and management, enforcement of the collective bargaining agreement and regulation of economic weapons used by both management and labor. This course will briefly address the Railway Labor Act, the Labor Management Reporting and Disclosure Act, and public sector rights and bargaining obligations. The Fall term course "Labor & Employment Law" is NOT a prerequisite.

Law in the Time of COVID

Course Page for Fall 2022 - Raymond, Margaret

In this course, we will look at selected areas of law that have been important during COVID, either because there’s been extensive litigation and law development, or because existing law has had to adapt to the unprecedented circumstances of a worldwide pandemic. The writing project will be a structured memorandum, prepared with the guidance of the instructor, addressing the best approach to a specific legal issue that is likely to arise in a future pandemic.

Law of Democracy

Course Page for Spring 2022 - Yablon, Robert

This course examines the laws that structure the American democratic system. Topics include voting rights, redistricting, campaign finance, and the regulation of political parties. The course addresses the key constitutional principles and statutory provisions that govern these areas, with particular emphasis on recent legal developments. In addition to covering doctrine, the course focuses on the theoretical underpinnings of the electoral system, the role of courts in overseeing the system, and proposals for reform. Prior or concurrent enrollment in Constitutional Law I and/or II is recommended but not required.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Spring 2022
Fall 2020

Law of Democracy

Course Page for Fall 2020 - Yablon, Robert

This course examines the laws that structure the American democratic system. Topics include voting rights, redistricting, campaign finance, and the regulation of political parties. The course addresses the key constitutional principles and statutory provisions that govern these areas, with particular emphasis on recent legal developments. In addition to covering doctrine, the course focuses on the theoretical underpinnings of the electoral system, the role of courts in overseeing the system, and proposals for reform. Prior or concurrent enrollment in Constitutional Law I and/or II is recommended but not required.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Spring 2022
Fall 2020

Legal Intersections

Course Page for Spring 2022 - Mitchell, Everett

Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice Administration: Legal Intersections

This course will explore the legal intersections between the child welfare and juvenile justice by exploring both systems through the lenses of trauma. In the first part of the course, students will explore Wis. Stat. Chapter 48 and the child welfare system in Wisconsin: From initial decision to remove children from their homes, court jurisdiction, dispositional orders, termination of parental rights warnings, the reasonable efforts that must be made by the department, permanency planning, conditions of return and termination of parental rights. In the second half of the course, students will learn about Juvenile Justice and the purpose of the system in Wis. Stat. Chapter 938. In this section of the course, students will became familiar with the stages of juvenile justice: detaining of juveniles in detention, confidentiality, trauma, youth juvenile assessments, dispositions (juvenile sentencing), rules of supervision, placement (in home, foster home, residential care centers, group homes, or Lincoln Hills/Cooper Lake), restorative justice and juvenile expungement. The intention of the course is for law school and social work students to work in teams to develop the skills necessary to support children and families.

Legislation & Regulation

Course Page for Spring 2022 - Desai, Anuj

This course provides an introduction to the federal laws and governmental institutions that shape significant aspects of social and economic policy. The course addresses legislation, statutory interpretation, regulation and administrative agencies. Legislation and regulation play the dominant role in shaping law and governance in the modern American legal system. While numerous other law school courses involve statutes and regulations or legislatures and administrative agencies, this course considers the overarching questions about these laws and institutions: how statutes are enacted and agency regulations issued, what tools lawyers use to shape statutes and regulations, how judges interpret them, etc. The main goal of the course is practical. All lawyers, irrespective of the area of law—from securities law to criminal law, from environmental law to tax, from labor and employment law to contract drafting, from military law to bankruptcy, etc.—must understand statutes and regulation. This course is aimed at providing students with a deeper understanding of these forms of law and the institutions that make this law, and to help them better appreciate the role that lawyers play in the American legal system as it operates in practice. To think like a lawyer, and hence to represent or advise clients, requires an ability to do so in the context of the regulatory state.

This course meets the Legal Process graduation requirement.

Learning Outcomes:

(i) To understand the role of legislatures, administrative agencies, and courts in the legal process.
(ii) To understand the relationship between and among these institutions.
(iii) To understand the role that lawyers play in furthering their clients’ interests in each of these institutions.
(iv) To understand the differences in the forms of legal argument that occur in these different institutions.
(v) To understand how courts interpret statutes.
(vi) To understand how administrative agencies interpret and implement statutes.
(vii) To understand how courts oversee the interpretation and implementation of statutes by administrative agencies.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Spring 2022
Spring 2021
Spring 2021

Mental Health Law

Course Page for Spring 2022 - Van Rybroek, Gregory

Learning Outcomes - By the end of this course, students will
1. understand that there is a complex intersection between the law and mental health issues
2. understand the role of lawyers when there are criminal/civil issues involving mental health problems
3. understand several specific nettlesome psycho-legal topics, and how the legal system reaches dispositions in these areas
4. develop a deeper and more realistic portrayal of mental health law issues, and how lawyers work inside and around another paradigm in their representation of clients - i.e., mental health evaluation and treatment

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Spring 2022
Spring 2021

Models of System Level Advocacy

Course Page for Spring 2021 - Jacklitz, Jill

See individual sections for descriptions.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Spring 2021

Presidential Debates

Course Page for Fall 2020 - Mayer, Ken, Williamson Jr., Brady

This course will analyze the history, legal and constitutional dimensions, regulatory issues, effects on public discourse, and legitimating functions of both primary and general election presidential debates. The course will include guest lectures from national political reporters, previous participants in candidate preparation, and national political figures involved in the process.

The course is open to senior political science and journalism majors, graduate students, and second and third year law students.

Privacy Law in the Information Age

Course Page for Spring 2021 - Bilder, Anne, Kastberg, Erin

This seminar-style course is about privacy --what it means to the courts, to the legislature, to the public, or whether it really means anything at all. Through a variety of source materials, including case law, legislation, essays, and literature, the course examines constitutional and common law approaches to privacy issues in many contexts -- our persons, our homes, our workplaces, our schools, our computers and cyberspace. It also includes cultural and comparative law dimensions of privacy. The instructors make a concerted effort to weave current events and "hot topics" in privacy into the syllabus and class discussions. Students are graded primarily on a final research paper, oral presentation of the paper in class, and on class participation. Pass/fail option is available.

Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students should have had the opportunity to engage in critical thinking about how the law reflects societal values about privacy in the following contexts:
1. Be familiar with the origins of U.S. privacy law;
2. Identify the four privacy torts;
3. Identify the privacy interests that are recognized and protected by the 4th Amendment;
4. Identify the privacy interests that are recognized and protected by the 1st Amendment;
5. Be familiar with how courts have applied the Constitution to decisions involving bodily integrity and medical decisions; and
6. Recognize and understand privacy implications in computing and on-line activities.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Spring 2021

Prosecution Function

Course Page for Spring 2022 - Glinberg, Lanny

See individual sections for descriptions.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Spring 2022
Spring 2021

Public Health Law

Course Page for Fall 2020 - Charo, R. Alta

Our experience with COVID-19 has vividly demonstrated need for a functioning public health system that ensures the health and wellbeing of citizens. While governments at all levels have varying degrees of power to provide for the public’s health, government action to protect health and well-being may conflict with constitutionally-protected rights of individuals. Thus, the question that lawyers, legislators, judges, and public health authorities must consider when contemplating government action is the extent to which the state may monitor and restrain citizens for the promotion of health, safety, and morals. This course will explore the legal foundations of the American public health system and the resulting struggle between individual liberties and the government’s interest in providing for its citizens' collective health and wellbeing. It will also use the COVID-19 experience to explore the operational challenges in a public health system, including supply chain management, business disruption, first responder safety, crisis standards for medical care and pharmaceutical/vaccine development, and international cooperation.

The goal is to provide students with the ability to understand: (1) structure and functions of the public health system; (2) the role of government (including judiciary), community, and individual involvement in public health; (3) the legal powers available at each level of government and (4) the tensions between governmental interests in public health and individual interests in liberty.

The course will take advantage of mixed method teaching, combining in-person classes with on-line learning and exercises. No textbook. Readings and exercises will be provided by instructor. Background in statistics, epidemiology, biology and medicine is welcome but not required. On-line materials will be made available to provide the basics needed to participate fully in the class.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

(1) describe and critique the authority of the state and federal government to limit personal freedom, economic transactions and land management for the purpose of promoting public health
(2) distinguish between the legality and the politics of various public health policy choices
(3) appreciate the interplay between immigration, race, class, geography, and education in the history and formation of public health policy

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Fall 2020

Public Interest Housing Workshop

Course Page for Fall 2022 -

Since 2009, 1 in 3 Detroit homes have been subject to property tax foreclosure. More troubling, the City assessed the majority of Detroit homes at rates that violated the Michigan Constitution, placing the unprecedented number of property tax foreclosures in disrepute. The problem, however, goes beyond Detroit. Racialized property tax injustice is a national racial justice issue that our country has yet to confront. After our one week intensive course, students will be prepared to work collaboratively with the Coalition for Property Tax Justice (illegalforeclosures.org) to end racialized property tax inequity in Detroit, Chicago, and Milwaukee. This is a 3-credit course with an enrollment limit of 12 students.

Class sessions (synchronous online) are 9/7 through 9/14 only (including Sat. 9/10); thereafter students work on project paper, which will be due at the end of the semester.

Class session times:
4:10-7:10 pm: 9/7, 9/8, 9/12, 9/13, 9/14
Noon-3:00 pm: 9/9 (Fri)
9:00 am -2:30 pm: 9/10 (Sat)

Students may fulfill the Upper-Level Writing Requirement in this course.

Public Law & Private Power

Course Page for Fall 2022 - Rogers, Joel

See individual sections for descriptions.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Fall 2022
Fall 2021
Fall 2020

Race, Racism, and the Law

Course Page for Fall 2021 - Mitchell, Everett

The killing of George Floyd on May 25th, 2020, re-ignited the demand by black lives matter activists, white allies and co-conspirators for community control of police, reallocating monies designated to police towards mental health resources and educational equity, and specific criminal justice reform meant to reduce the number of non-violent offenders sitting in jail with cash bail awaiting trial. This course will explore these events through the lenses of racism and the codification of certain laws and United States Supreme Court decisions to undergird systemic narratives of racial inferiority of people of color. The intention is to ensure that students have a lens to view the current context through a historical point of view that demonstrates the unique role that lawyers must play if legal systems that maintain inequitable systems will eventually be dismantled and destroyed.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Fall 2021
Fall 2020

Research & Administrative Issues in Taxation

Course Page for Fall 2022 - Misey, Robert

See individual sections for descriptions.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Fall 2022
Fall 2021

Sports Law

Course Page for Spring 2022 - Schaub, Josh

Sports lawyering is not entirely what you saw in the movie Jerry Maguire. The agent-player relationship is just a tiny fraction of sports lawyering. This class will cover, in a small part, that relationship, but seeks to broaden the concept of sports law to everything related to the business, law, and regulation of sport. There will be an emphasis on antitrust laws and the impact it has on the business of sport. This class will further combine doctrinal concepts including antitrust, labor law, intellectual property, commissioner’s powers, amateur sports, and immigration law. Students can expect practical teachings by being presented real life scenarios encountered by real sports lawyers and being asked to apply the assigned case law to resolve issues for employers and clients.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Spring 2022
Spring 2021

State & Local Government Law

Course Page for Fall 2022 - Seifter, Miriam

This course studies state and local government law in the United States. Although much of legal discourse focuses on the national government, it is in fact state and local governments that influence much of our day to day lives. Moreover, state and local government decision-making will play a prominent role in many of your legal careers. And state and local government law is at the center of some of the most significant theoretical and normative questions in American law, including those regarding democracy, federalism, and distributive justice.

The course will include study of the allocation of authority within and between state and local governments. This will include analysis of the three branches of state government and separation of powers questions arising among them, as well as analysis of how local governments are structured, financed, and organized. We will also study how state and local governments interact, covering doctrines of home rule and intrastate preemption. Throughout, we will ask whether and how current doctrines and policies implicate democracy, efficiency, and distributive justice. In addition, we will explore how these various doctrines and ideas play out in the context of contemporary disputes, including over housing, education, and immigration.

This course will have components of both a traditional lecture class and a more hands-on research seminar. Students will attend and participate in weekly lectures; they will also learn about the need for research on state and local issues and will complete a final paper or project on a topic relevant to the course. Depending on course enrollment, one or more adjunct instructors may participate in the supervision of final research projects.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Fall 2022
Spring 2022
Spring 2021

Taxation of Mergers & Acquisitions

Course Page for Fall 2022 - Schnur, Robert

See individual sections for descriptions.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Fall 2022
Fall 2021
Fall 2020

Technology Law

Course Page for Spring 2022 - Ard, BJ

This course examines how the legal system responds to technological change. We will study the legal, economic, and social impacts of so-called “disruptive” technologies; the strategies through which courts, legislatures, administrative agencies, and international institutions respond to the legal uncertainty surrounding new technologies; and efforts by both incumbent and newcomer industries—and their attorneys—to use the law to support their preferred business models in the face of change.

Specific technologies to be discussed include smartphones, autonomous weapon systems, domestic drones, robotics, driverless cars, cyberwarfare, the railroad, the internet of things, social media, big data analytics, the sharing economy, and 3D-printing.

This course is appropriate for students regardless of their prior experience with technology or their career interests; there are no course prerequisites. New technologies have raised challenges in every area of the law, and the regulatory strategies and modes of legal argumentation explored in this course are transferable across subject areas.

Recent Offerings of this course by this instructor

Spring 2022
Spring 2021

Trials of the Holocaust

Course Page for Spring 2021 - Tuerkheimer, Frank

This course studies the Holocaust through six different trials held after the Second World War in which alleged perpetrators of the Holocaust were defendants, from concentration camp guards to the upper levels of the Nazi bureaucracy. The course places the Holocaust into historical context and shows how it is interwoven with the Second World War. The course ends with efforts of courage and heroism by nations and individuals to save Jewish lives.

Workers Compensation Law

Course Page for Spring 2022 - Aplin, Ronald

This experiential course is taught by experienced attorneys designed to introduce second and third year law students to worker’s compensation law and procedure. Ronald S. Aplin of Aplin & Ringsmuth, LLC is the primary instructor, along with Hayley Clark of the same firm. Students are assigned to advocate fictitious Wisconsin worker’s compensation claims from the pleading stage to hearing. Roughly half of the class sessions involve a traditional lecture/discussion format, although legal, procedural and medical topics are discussed with the fictitious claims in mind. In other class sessions, guest experts, including an orthopedic surgeon, a psychologist, and a vocational expert, pose as witnesses in the fictitious claims, and are “examined” and “cross-examined” by experienced attorneys, as if they were testifying at hearing. One class session involves the direct and cross-examination of a claimant from one of the fictitious claims. Students learn about medical, psychological and vocational science, and acquire litigation skills in these class sessions. Current administrative law judges also teach a class session as guest lecturers on effective advocacy at hearing, and on settlement. At the conclusion of the course, students are required to write a brief advocating their clients’ positions in the fictitious cases for hearing, and then litigate their clients’ claims in a two-hour mock worker’s compensation hearing, conducted during the final exam period before a current administrative law judge. Course materials include the Wisconsin Worker’s Compensation Handbook by John D. Neal and Joseph P. Danas, and additional materials provided to students by the instructor electronically.